Assassin’s Apprentice by Robin Hobb

 

“Learning is never wrong. Even learning how to kill isn’t wrong. Or right. It’s just a thing to learn, a thing I can teach you. That’s all.”  

Several days ago I found myself sitting outside my favorite San Diego coffee spot, sipping a hot beverage, and finishing the last chapters of Robin Hobbs Assassin’s Apprentice, the first in the Farseer Trilogy. The dilemma I was facing was how to disguise the fact that here I was, a barbarian, choking up with tears reading a fantasy book. I honestly can’t remember the last time a book made me so emotional. I won’t go into the details of the scene that got me for spoiler reasons but it deals with friendship of the highest order.

Even with my extremely busy schedule I manage to read a lot of books, most of them great, enjoyable pieces of fantasy or scifi. The greatest triumph and exquisitely rewarding experience is coming across a novel that blows your mind, makes me feel something beyond entertainment, makes me want to shove it in all my friends faces while yelling READ THIS NOW! Robin Hobbs Assassin’s Apprentice falls into this category. It goes on my badass shelf(digital shelf nowadays) of favorite novels next to Lord of the Rings, Dune, Hyperion, A Song of Ice and Fire, and the other masterpieces of the genre.

Assassin’s Apprentice follows the young life of a noble bastard Fitzchivalry thrust into the intrigues of court life in the Six Duchies and the peril it entails. As an illegitimate and ignored bastard Fitz gets recruited into the role of becoming the Kings secret assassin. Making matters worse the Six Duchies are being raided by mysterious Red Ships that leave nothing but devastation and despair wherever they appear. Fitz becomes the secret hand of the King, and this first book details his early education in the art of poisoning and political maneuvering.

The beauty of this novel does not lie in a grand plot but in Robin Hobbs fantastic characterization. Assassin’s Apprentice is a slow burn, a patient novel that builds up all of the characters and their relationships slowly with beautiful detail. It’s a adult book that focuses on questions about friendship, loyalty, duty, family, and even your choice of romantic partner. It’s maturity of voice reminded me of one of my other favorite books, The Curse of Chalion, by Louis McMaster Bujold. Both novels focus on character and relationship over plot and action and both novels are masterpieces of the fantasy genre in my opinion.

This novel belongs on the must read list for any serious lover of fantasy. The best part for me is that this is only book one of a long series. I get to finish typing this review and start the next book. So if you love fantasy consider this post the digital version of me shoving it in your face and yelling READ THIS NOW!

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Assassin’s Apprentice by Robin Hobb

  1. Ok, I’m having a real hard time choosing what series to read next after finsihing all the Mark Lawrence books… Darn, I’m torn between Robin Hobb and Dan Polansky, but after reading your review I’m inclined to be sold on Robin Hobb, really curious what kind of book would make a barbarian choke up with tears – I have to read this! Ok, I’ll flip a coin, damnit.

    Like

  2. Pingback: A Barbarian Book Update | Barbarian Book Club

Spew your nonsense

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s