Category: On Writing

On classic vs modern writing.

Dartagnan-musketeers
Bunch of drunken rakes.

I often get in these black moods where I just want to close off my social media, erase everything, and unplug from the internet. Most posters on facebook and twitter are dimwit chimpanzees thumping their chests and flinging excrement at each other. Sites like twitter and facebook, even good blogs that I often read, are nothing but time traps. Infinity pools designed to keep you coming back and refreshing.

But as a writer, networking is important, if not critical. Best of all I follow a small circle of independent writers that are at the cutting edge of the fantasy world. I know that some of them will one day break out and take their rightful place among the greats.

The current exciting conversation is taking place over at Emperorponders, where he is discussing the current unshakable trend of Deep Third Person POV and how it harms the fantasy and science fiction field. Read his posts, they are thought-provoking and made me analyze my own writing.

Misha Burnett joins the conversation and brings up the topic of The Invisible Character. Who is the narrator and who is he speaking to. In his opinion, a writer must keep in mind who is telling the tale and to whom in order to get the proper voice across. Fascinating stuff that I will keep in the back of my mind when writing.

Inspired by these posts I sat down and knocked out the first draft intro for a new fantasy piece using distant omniscient third-person point of view.

It was a dark time. A time of war and massacre. A time when regicide plunged the country into bloody war. Republican fanatics, in the name of liberty and freedom, deposed and executed the rightful King. Loyalist took up arms to restore the monarchy and engulfed the land in bloodshed. Neighbor turned on neighbor, brother killed brother, all was chaos and strife as each side committed bloody crime and atrocity. Common peasants suffered from bands of armed men roaming the countryside looting indiscriminately, murdering anyone that didn’t swear fealty to whatever cause they championed.
It was in this dark time that two men traveled through the ancient Hercynian wood. They trudged north, racing the icy winter whose early snows were already upon them. The younger of the two was Oswin the Magnificent, at that time known as Oswin the Hand due to his predilection towards thievery, or due to his skill with women if he was the one telling the story. His companion was Merle, a fat itinerant priest, a follower of the Good Book and a lover of drink and village women. The pair had no destination, but they both knew that staying well ahead of the war was the best course of action for men like them.

From here I plan on going in deep into the perspective of the character then pulling out when needed. I’m excited about this one.

 

Support the Indy Scene.

I know a lot of good independent writers. I know a number of good independent artists, and few really top notch independent editors. I even know several good independent voice actors for recording audiobooks. All of which is great, because it means that new, original fiction is being created and brought to market on a […]

via Cirsova: The time to jump on the bandwagon is now. — mishaburnett

I’m with Misha  on this, Cirsova is one of a few short story markets I look forward to reading every time a new issue comes out.

Storyhack Issue 2

Storyhack2Pretty excited to announce that I will have another story with Storyhack Action & Adventure. Bryce Beattie has fantastic taste when it comes to short stories so I feel honored to share space with some cool authors like David J West who wrote my favorite story in issue 0 and the awesome grimdark novel Brutal that I reviewed back in January. Not to mention Jon Mollison, author of Moon Full of Stars, another excellent independent novella well worth picking up.

Once the release date is revealed I will share it with everybody. Supporting independent publishing focused on exciting action and adventure that takes inspiration from the classic adventure pulps is critical, expecially in the age of constant regurgitated Mouse Wars, Lensflare Trek, and the lukewarm Marvel nonsense. So if you haven’t checked out Storyhack go ahead and pick up issue 0 for free and read my story. If you enjoy, please pick up the next two issues.

Writing and Casablanca.

My wife and I watched the 1942 classic Casablancaa few nights ago. It had been over a dozen years since I had seen it, and it was the first time for my wife. All I have to say is that the movie is classic for a reason, and that it gets better with each viewing. […]

via Casablanca: What a Damn Near Perfect Movie Can Teach About Writing — Amatopia

Experimenting with Steemit

Steemit seems to be all the rage with a certain subsection of the new pulprev crowd, so I’ve decided to experiment with some of my older stories. While I’m not particularly convinced about the implementation and the use of posting stories on Steemit the concept is intriguing. Sadly the interface is ugly, clunky, and somewhat confusing.

Adobe Spark (1)

I’m friendly to the idea that people that post on social media, especially if it’s interesting self-generated original content, should be compensated. I’m very into the idea of decentralized self-publishing and multiple independent methods of distribution for entertainment. So overall I think this is an experiment in getting out my work to readers using a different method. I hope to reach a few new readers.

Read, follow, upvote, and comment on A Tiger in the Garden on Steemit!