Category: Reading & Critique

It’s been awhile old friends.

It’s two in the afternoon on Columbus day. My wife is napping with the kid and I’ve grown bored of trolling all the typical Columbus Day lib-posts, and Morrissey keeps popping up on my Spotifiy mix. In a few hours when everyone wakes up we will head out to our friends for dinner. Life is good.

Life has been busy. Between my life draining job and my responsibilities to my wife and kid I have very little time to myself. That small window of time is mostly taken by reading, writing fiction, and spending time with my wife watching movies or just hanging out. This place has been suffering. Mostly because it was always intended as a author site but right now I don’t really have a lot to put out.

I’ve written some short stories and have some more in the process but none of them really match the indy market. I don’t know where to submit them. I’m coming to the realization that my work doesn’t really jive with what editors like. Especially because I’m using the short story format to experiment with voice and style. I expect that in the future I will put out a collection of stories. I’m just not sure that they make a coherent product at this point.

More importantly I’ve started the groundwork on a novel. The last few months have been dedicated to research. I’m currently in the outline phase and plan on starting the first draft around the Thanksgiving holiday. The goal is to finish and publish before I head out on another South Pacific adventure next spring.

But, I digress. The point of this post was to discuss my plan for this blog. I’ve feel that a lot of fantasy review blogs suck. I can’t stand reading most of them. So instead of whining I’m going to start writing more in-depth reviews of books I think need general attention. I’m going to focus on indy books, specifically in the pulp-rev adjacent scene.

The reviews I plan on writing will be comprehensive. I’ll take recommendations but I’m rather picky when it comes to what I want to read so I might never get around to doing one on a book you wrote or would like reviewed.

I created a badge system. My reviews will only have three ratings. Blank, Honorable, and Golden. I will go in depth about what each entails but expect the majority of books to get blanks.

Barbarian Book Club: 6 June 2019

Another month goes by and I managed to scrape by with seven books. How I yearn for the old days where I could spend all day reading. Sometimes finishing two novels a day. Being a husband and a father take up most of my time. I’m looking forward to retirement where I can spend my days reclining in an armchair, drinking tea, and devouring books.

The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt. A modern western about two brothers sent to California to kill a man who owes their boss money. It had a few moments but overall disappointing. It came off as a Tarantino pastiche that couldn’t decide if it wanted to be serious or comically absurd. But it’s biggest sin was leaving out the most important character in any western. The West itself. Great westerns always make the land a character. The deserts, the mesas, the wide plains, and treacherous mountain passes. The land itself must be in the novel.

The Medici: Power, Money, and Ambition in the Italian Renaissance by Paul Strathern A fantastic historical overview of the powerful Medici family that rose from modest means to being some of the principals behind the Italian Renaissance. Bankers, Patrons, Bishops, Dukes, Popes, and Queens, the Medici rose to the heights of European power. The books main focus is on the height of the family during the Renaissance, from Cosimo through Lorenzo, wrapping up with the eventual fall of the family into obscurity. Fascinatingly the book also focuses on the artists, poets, and writers such as Michelangelo, showcasing the massive impact on the artistic revival of the most illustrious Medici.

A Brightness Long Ago by Guy Gavriel Kay Outstanding novel. My favorite fantasy read this year. My complete review here.

The Renaissance at War (Smithsonian History of Warfare) by Thomas Arnold The Smithsonian History of Warfare series is really good. Quick pocket size books filled with maps, charts, diagrams, and all sorts of great information for anybody interested in a more in depth look into historical warfare.

Landsknecht Soldier 1486–1560 (Warrior) by John Richards Quick chapbook on the famous mercenaries. The Osprey Publishing books make great research material for writers. I read this one in a few hours while watching some young guns qualify on the rifle range.

Magnifico: The Brilliant Life and Violent Times of Lorenzo de’ Medici by Miles Unger I find the political history of the Italian city states during the Renaissance interesting and the Medici of Florence are some of the most interesting players of the era. Lorenzo the Magnificent being the best example of a Renaissance lord. A dark, brooding, complex man who was an expert and ruthless political player yet abhorred the process, pining for the freedom to tend garden and write poetry. I also enjoy biographies and believe that all writers should read biographies. Getting a deep understanding of great men and women helps one create complex believable characters.

A Song for Arbonne by Guy Gavriel Kay This was a audiobook re-read. Kay is one of the rare modern fantasy writers I enjoy reading and A Song for Arbonne is my favorite one of his fantasy novels. This one has great characters, set in a fantastic fantasy version of Cathar Provencal in the age of the Troubadours. It ends with a great medieval battle that doesn’t quite reach the heights in Return of the King yet comes close enough to make it memorable. I highly recommend this one.

A Brightness Long Ago by Guy Gavriel Kay

The sailors say the rain misses the cloud even as it falls through light or dark into the sea. I miss her like that as I fall through my life, through time, the chaos of our time. I dream of her some nights, still, but there is nothing to give weight or value to that, it is only me, and what I want to be true. It is only longing.

A Brightness Long Ago by Guy Gavriel Kay

I discovered Guy Gavriel Kay several years ago when I returned to Fantasy. Originally I started reading A Song of Ice and Fire but quickly became burned out on the nihilism and onslaught of negativity in those books. Yes, the world is dark and often people are cruel, and nasty. But the world is also beautiful and people can be surprisingly selfless, heroic, and noble. More often than not people can be both cruel and selfless, both heroic and nasty.

After almost giving up on Fantasy because I didn’t want to read nihilistic grimdark or the bloated door stoppers focused on magical power systems, I stumbled on Guy Gavriel Kay’s Tigana and fell in love with Fantasy all over again. Here was a modern writer that wrote beautiful literary fantasy with a depth of emotion not found anywhere else.

Kay’s novels are poetically written historical fantasies. Worlds and characters in fantasy worlds slightly different but recognizable. His poetic writing and focus on theme over plot give his novels an almost impressionistic feel, full of sorrowful and nostalgic moods invoking a hazy watercolor like experience.

Some of his past novels that I consider some of my personal favorite, are The Lions of Al-Rassan and A Song for Arbonne. The first takes place in a fantasy version of Andalusia during the Reconquista. Lions is as story about war, love, friendship, and loyalty, in a world that is ceasing to exist. The latter, and my favorite, is set in a Fantasy version of south-western France somewhat inspired by the Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade. A mercenary from the north becomes involved in a web of war and politics involving the Troubadour culture of the Arabonne’s Court of Love.

I read a lot of Kay’s novels but my interest in his work began to taper once he switched his focus away from European inspired work and began writing several novels based on Chinese Dynasties, a historical subject I don’t have much interest in. But, randomly I came across news that he was about to release a new work, a novel set in a Fantasy version of Renaissance Italy, which has been my historical obsession for the past year. I pre-ordered right away.

A Brightness Long Ago might be my Kay’s best novel to date. A thematically complex work focused on memory and the intersection of choice and fate. Our main character is Guidanio Cerra, a well educated son of a tailor now a powerful member of Seressa’s(Fantasy Venice) ruling council. He mournfully recalls his youth where his life crossed paths with two powerful feuding Condottiere Folco d’Acrosi and Teobaldo Monticola di Remigio, and the fateful events surrounding their final confrontation.

Guidanio’s recollections are written in conversational first person and filled with his philosophical and religious musings on memory, love, fate, and will. But other characters and sections are written in third person, giving us a complex and satisfying view of the personalities populating this world.

The beauty of this novel is not in the plot, which is painted with broad strokes, but in the interconnected depth of characters and in the theme of fate and choice. Several times in the novel minor characters make small, seemingly inconsequential choices that turn out to have life changing consequences in later chapters.

What I personally loved is the lack of linear logic in the chain of events. Sometimes things just happen. People just die. People get sick. People make irrational decisions that lead to catastrophic results. Sometimes your favorite loses the race and you go home. Sometimes the heroes don’t answer the call. Sometimes you luck out and win. Maybe the person you randomly meet is ends up being the love of your life, or maybe not, and you quickly forget each other.

As humans we tend to think of our lives, the past, history, as a logical linear progression and our brains invent a connected narrative. But, real life isn’t like that, the narrative is always tacked on with hindsight. The future is hard to predict due to the vagaries of fate and choice. A Brightness Long Ago captures this like no novel I’ve read before. For the first time in awhile I was actually surprised at some of the events without it feeling contrived.

The setting is beautiful and full of depth and the characters, from the major players to the minor ones that only stay with you for a few paragraphs are perfectly written. Connoisseurs of Italian Renaissance history will recognize Kay’s fantasy stand ins for the city-states, the mercenaries, the Medici, the Popes, and numerous other Renaissance personalities like Michelangelo. The world has a magical quality but also feels real and more complex than fantasy worlds developed over numerous novels.

A Brightness Long Ago is a fantastic, beautiful, and elegant novel. The perfect mix of literary and fantastic writing. A novel that goes beyond plot, exploring complex theme, yet doesn’t sacrifice character, adventure, and magic. I have a feeling it stay at the top of my favorites for a long time.

Barbarian Book Club: 5 May 2019

I read a lot of books. This past week I read one novel, one memoir, and two short story collections. Before starting this post I bought eight books.

Every time I finish a book I tell myself that I’m going to sit down and write an in depth, detailed, well written review. A review worthy of a glossy literature magazine, something insightful that will make you run out and get whatever book, read it, and drive to where I am so you can sit around drinking espresso, smoking cigarettes, and discussing the literary merits of said book with me.

I never do.

So instead of writing critiques worthy of Harold Bloom I’m just going to let list a few of the things I’ve read recently and particularly recommend them. I’m also going to link to Amazon using my affiliate link. Why? Because this site costs me money to keep add free. 

Some Recently Read

Fight Club by Chuck Palaniuk. I saw the movie when it first came out. I was in high school and my brother and I came across it one day on cable. It blew our mind. One of my close friends became a Palahniuk super fan, guy read every one of his books numerous times, owned signed copies, convinced me to try one of the books. I borrowed Choke from my girlfriend and read it real quick. Didn’t like it. Too edgy in that try hard kind of way. It didn’t click with early twenties me so I passed on Palaniuk. Fiveteen years later I’m at the gym listening to the Bret Easton Ellis podcast and Chuck Palaniuk is one of the guests. Before he comes on B.E.E. talks about Fight Club, book and movie, and my peaks my interest. I loved the movie, maybe I should give the book a try. I did and don’t regret it. It’s well written, exceptionally creative, and quick paced. It captures that late 90’s hatred and nihilism that seemed to permeate everything. From a writers perspective chapter six is outstanding, a piece of prose with interrupting beets that reads like a charged punk song. Each scene is prefaced and interrupted by one of the “Rules of Fight Club,” the book is worth it for this chapter alone.

Airships by Barry Hannah. A few days ago I hit up all my homies on Twitter asking for litfic recommendation. I wanted something good, something meaty, something that read like the second pack Marlboro Reds washed down with cheap beer after a night of disappointment. My boy Neal delivered by recommending Hannah. Airships is a short story collection that blends the civil war with Vietnam, adds a dash of New York lit snobbery and flavors it with a dash of Southern Gothic. Hannah is a must read. I can’t believe I’ve never heard of him before. This is what litfic should be. No cat lady victimology knitting circles here.

The Battle for Spain: The Spanish Civil War 1936-1939 by Anthony Beevor. One of the best history books I’ve ever read. A brutal account of one of most intriguing and overlooked conflicts of the 20th century. The Spanish Civil war was a war where the losers wrote the history. It was the first massively propagandized war and so much of it is misunderstood or even deliberately misconstrued. The early sections describing the build up, the escalating hatred between countrymen towards each other is chilling, specifically in the light of our current political climate where the centrist position is losing ground to extremism from both sides. I highly recommend this book, not just for history buffs but for everyone.

White Rajah: A Biography of Sir James Brooke by Nigel Barely. I’ve always had a fascination with the South Pacific in the 19th century. I love the opium trade, jungles, China Clippers, trade companies, and all of the adventure that goes along with the great men behind the history. My favorite novel is Tai Pan and Hong Kong and its history is one of my favorite places I’ve visited. So a few month ago work decided to send me to the jungles of Sarawak, what used to be the Kingdom of Sarawak founded by the British adventurer James Brooke. Sarawak was ruled by the White Rajahs for three generations, well into the 20th century, and the last of the Rajahs was buried in Kuching in 2013. While the book itself isn’t that great, with a strange focus on Brooke’s homosexuality, I read it the first few days I was in Sarawak and it was cool seeing all of the places built by Brooke in person during my free time.

The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky The greatest novel ever written. Make sure you read this translation.

Natasha’s Dance: A Cultural History of Russia by Orlando Figes. A comprehensive and intriguing cultural history starting with Peter the Great’s founding of St. Petersburg through the death of Stalin. The focus of the book is mostly on the cultural and civil life of Russians in the 19th century going into detail about Russian art, music, ballet, and the fascination and dual nature between the enlightenment of Western Europe and the Orthodox nationalism of the peasant. Some of the most interesting and painful to read chapters were about the plight of the artistic revolutionaries after the Soviet Revolution. Soviet true believer committees that turned art and literature into propaganda for Stalin only to be denounced later and sent to the death camps themselves.

I read a lot more, but this should do for now. A few of the books I’ve read deserve more in depth reviews, specifically White by Bret Easton Ellis. Other books were too historically technical, obscure, or instructive to merit a recommendation.