Tag: Book Reviews

Barbarian Book Club: 6 June 2019

Another month goes by and I managed to scrape by with seven books. How I yearn for the old days where I could spend all day reading. Sometimes finishing two novels a day. Being a husband and a father take up most of my time. I’m looking forward to retirement where I can spend my days reclining in an armchair, drinking tea, and devouring books.

The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt. A modern western about two brothers sent to California to kill a man who owes their boss money. It had a few moments but overall disappointing. It came off as a Tarantino pastiche that couldn’t decide if it wanted to be serious or comically absurd. But it’s biggest sin was leaving out the most important character in any western. The West itself. Great westerns always make the land a character. The deserts, the mesas, the wide plains, and treacherous mountain passes. The land itself must be in the novel.

The Medici: Power, Money, and Ambition in the Italian Renaissance by Paul Strathern A fantastic historical overview of the powerful Medici family that rose from modest means to being some of the principals behind the Italian Renaissance. Bankers, Patrons, Bishops, Dukes, Popes, and Queens, the Medici rose to the heights of European power. The books main focus is on the height of the family during the Renaissance, from Cosimo through Lorenzo, wrapping up with the eventual fall of the family into obscurity. Fascinatingly the book also focuses on the artists, poets, and writers such as Michelangelo, showcasing the massive impact on the artistic revival of the most illustrious Medici.

A Brightness Long Ago by Guy Gavriel Kay Outstanding novel. My favorite fantasy read this year. My complete review here.

The Renaissance at War (Smithsonian History of Warfare) by Thomas Arnold The Smithsonian History of Warfare series is really good. Quick pocket size books filled with maps, charts, diagrams, and all sorts of great information for anybody interested in a more in depth look into historical warfare.

Landsknecht Soldier 1486–1560 (Warrior) by John Richards Quick chapbook on the famous mercenaries. The Osprey Publishing books make great research material for writers. I read this one in a few hours while watching some young guns qualify on the rifle range.

Magnifico: The Brilliant Life and Violent Times of Lorenzo de’ Medici by Miles Unger I find the political history of the Italian city states during the Renaissance interesting and the Medici of Florence are some of the most interesting players of the era. Lorenzo the Magnificent being the best example of a Renaissance lord. A dark, brooding, complex man who was an expert and ruthless political player yet abhorred the process, pining for the freedom to tend garden and write poetry. I also enjoy biographies and believe that all writers should read biographies. Getting a deep understanding of great men and women helps one create complex believable characters.

A Song for Arbonne by Guy Gavriel Kay This was a audiobook re-read. Kay is one of the rare modern fantasy writers I enjoy reading and A Song for Arbonne is my favorite one of his fantasy novels. This one has great characters, set in a fantastic fantasy version of Cathar Provencal in the age of the Troubadours. It ends with a great medieval battle that doesn’t quite reach the heights in Return of the King yet comes close enough to make it memorable. I highly recommend this one.