Pre-Tolkien Fantasy Challange Roundup: Part II

PreTolkien

We are on week three of the Pre-Tolkien Challenge and the whole adventure has been very successful. A lot of great people have joined up and written about their favorite fantasy work from a great era of fiction. Check some of it here in the Pre-Tolkien Challenge Roundup: Part I.

Reading the classics of Fantasy and Science Fiction, writing about the great stories and great authors, and having good discussions is critical now more than ever. The relentless Cult of Resentment is constantly attacking every single pillar of our civilization and culture. Today the festering anal fissure of science fiction and fantasy Tor.com vomited another “problematic” book burning screed where the author flat out said that Lovecraft should never be recommended and that Tolkien makes him uncomfortable. Read the garbage here.

Of course once you look deeper you realize that the writer of the piece is a fantasy author himself. A creepy, balding, gummy creep with a pedoface like no other. He shits on the classics, shits on Tolkien and then hustles creepy cheap Narnia ripoff YA. Described by Kirkus “paid” reviews as “Madeline is white and blonde, Jason is Chinese-American, and their culturally diverse friend group in the Sunlit Lands includes an Apsáalooke and a Native Hawaiian boy. For Narnia fans who enjoy heavy snark, this is a must-read.”Check that part out Narnia fans who enjoy heavy SNARK. 

These two bit poverty pimp hustlers want to memory-hole and destroy the greats of our genre and replace their work with their own cheap soulless garbage. This example being Tor.com is appropriate, after all, Tor is the home of John Scalzi, the scribe of resentment who made a career rewriting Hadelman, Heinlein, Herbert, and Piper, but snarky. Fuck snarky. Nobody likes snarky. The snarky teenage girl trope was invented by pedo 80s movie writers. It isn’t real except maybe in the damaged mind of former child actors.

So, yes fellow pulp warriors. This isn’t just a fun exercise where we blog about our favorite stories. This is us taking the field against enemies that hate everything we love.

So, without further commentary, check out these posts:

Once again, these posts are awesome. I’m sure I’ve missed a few, so I will go through all my Twitter mentions and comments, and I have a few more of my own pending. Lets keep the conversation going. Lets talk about what made the old pulps and the old writers great. Because if we don’t we cede the ground to people like the Tor crowd who are hell bent on tearing down and destroying.

 

Some December reading.

Last week I told everybody about my long flight to San Diego and back. A total of 23 hours worth of travel. Not including customs, waiting to board, shuttle, and driving. The good thing about having long flights is that I get to sit back, relax, and catch up on my reading. I managed to finish three novels on just the flights alone.

My first read was One Eyed Jacks by J.D. Brink. A great pulp noir piece involving casinos, gunfights, exotic women, islands in the Pacific, and a dash of magic reminiscent of Big Trouble in Little China. I devoured this one real quick because it was sooneeyedjacks.jpg fun. Right up there with what I am looking for from the pulp revival style. Fun, exciting fiction that reads like my favorite movies from the 80s. I came across J.D. Brink in issue #3 of Cirsova magazine and look forward to reading more of his stuff.

The second read happens to leave me with a bit of apprehension. John C. Wrights The Iron Chamber of Memory. Wright is one of the writers that gets lauded in certain circles, specifically the Sad Puppy blogosphere. For the most part, I agree with the SP crowd in principle but not in practice(that debate is for another post). But, I am definitely on board with the Pulp Revolution/Revival that branched off from a lot of the SP stuff. Both camps recommend Wright so I decided to finally give him a try outside short stories, having previously only read his Parliament of Beasts and Birds and enjoying it.

Wrights prose is great. I enjoy his Erudite style with multiple references to biblical themes, antiquity, and medieval literature. Writing above the usual level of SFF, up there with Dan Simmons and GGK while lacking the purple prose of hironchamberofmemory.jpgacks like Rothfuss. Sadly this book lacked the proper plot for me to find enjoyment in it.

The plot started well and interesting. An aging estate on the Isle of Sark, a young man, and his best friends fiancee. Mysterious happenings, strange history, a struggle with friendship and love. Unfortunately, without giving away the plot twists the book devolves into a Harry Dresden-ish urban fantasy with some of the most obnoxiously preachy moralizings I have ever read. A cool mysterious setting was ruined by what basically came down to an infodump ending where characters talked to each other.

I am going to have to give Wright one more try because I have a feeling I picked up the wrong book.

Finally the third book I finished on my return flight ended up being my favorite. Of course, it is written by my favorite writer, Peter Hamilton. I read his first published novel, Mindstar Rising. A near future post global warming cyberpunk novel. Greg Mendel is a mindstar-risingprivate investigator, but he is special because he has been modified by the British military with a gland that allows him to discern emotions. Gregs England is one of post global warming and coming down from a decade of totalitarian socialist rule. He is hired to assist an ultra powerful corporation in ferreting out a mole that is sabotaging their production lines. Lots of cool cyberpunk hacking, mind reading, fighting bioengineered war panthers, and all the awesome stuff I tend to love about Hamilton’s novels. Most of all its part one of three so I have plenty to read for the rest of the month.

Well, as I write this it 3 pm on Christmas Eve. Soon I will be getting ready to go out and enjoy a nice dinner and some drinks with the wife. I hope all of you have a Merry Christmas.

 

Fallen Dragon by Peter Hamilton

It’s just that nowhere you live can ever be exotic. That’s only ever somewhere else.

Fallen Dragon

After finishing the fantastic House of Suns by Alastair Reynolds I decided to continue my adventures in Space Opera by returning to my favorite Science Fiction writer, Peter Hamilton. I picked up Fallen Dragon, one of Hamilton’s standalone novels. The other one being Great North Road which I loved. I was not disappointed.

Fallen Dragon takes place in a future where interstellar travel is possible, humans have colonized  and terraformed several new worlds. Unfortunately space travel and colonization is astronomically expensive and unprofitable. The interplanetary corporations who funded colonization now fight and raid colonies in what is deemed “asset realization.” Using private armies equipped with  nearly unstoppable biological combat suits  they overpower the less sophisticated colonists and loot and pillage as much as possible to take back to Earth.

This is the world in which Lawerence Newton lives in. A wealthy son of a colonial corporate magnate who gave up his wealth and heritage for a chance to travel the stars. Instead of becoming the starship pilot he dreamed of he ended up a grunt for Zanitu-Brauns, a vicious raiding corporation, planetary assault army.

The main plot of the novel revolves around Zanitu-Brauns latest raid on a small backwater colony. The operation that should of been a walk in the park for the well trained and equipped Z-B troops becomes a disaster due to a well organized and unexpected counterinsurgency. In the middle of the quagmire Lawrence hatches a scheme. Somewhere on the planet is a treasure that if he recovers would make him and his platoon rich beyond their dreams.

Fallen Dragon delivers on numerous levels and explores several interesting science fiction concepts. Planetary colonization and terraforming is a major part of the novels background, detailing a very interesting colonization of a frozen world. Advanced military technology and the price of interstellar travel is a key element. The price of space tends to be waved away by post scarcity concepts in most scifi. My personal favorite concepts was the exploration of post democratic corporate governments. Where the power of your vote was tied to the amount of stake you held in the corporation. Stake you could earn through working for the corp and investing your pay.

So in closing Fallen Dragon did not disappoint. Another massive piece of space opera mixed with a post cyberpunk aesthetic and a dash of military science fiction, that kept me thinking about its ideas and themes well past the end.

 

Great North Road by Peter F. Hamilton

I’m a fan of huge novels. Giant tomes of Science Fiction filled with equally massive concepts and ideas. Currently my favorite writer in the Epic Space Opera department is the British Peter F. Hamilton. Best known for his Commonwealth Novels Pandora’s Star and Judas Unchained; some of the best post Hyperion scifi.

Hamilton writes big. Civilizations that span multiple worlds, hyper-intelligent AI, characters whose existence spans multiple lifetimes due to biotechnology, and hands down the most interesting alien life-form in scifi(Morning Light Mountain.) Best of all, unlike the bullshit trend perpetrated by fantasy authors, Hamilton actually finishes his series. He also writes fantastic stand alone novels.

GNR

Great North Road is one of Hamilton’s stand alones. A complex  planet spanning mystery, mixed with a military thriller, and  just the right amount of gritty cyberpunk.

The novel takes place in the early 22nd century. Earth is connected to dozens of new inhabited planets by portal technology. Portal technology owned and controlled by multi-world corporations ran by identical clone families.

The action starts with Newcastle Police Detective Sidney Hurst investigating a gruesome murder. The victim, a clone member of the worlds wealthiest family the Norths, creators of the portal technology, and providers of most of the worlds bio-fuel.

The high profile case is furthermore complicated by the fact that twenty years prior, several other members of the North family were murdered in a nearly identical fashion. The supposed murderer, Angela Tramelo has spent the last twenty years in a maximum security prison, the entire time proclaiming her innocence and blaming the murders on a monster.

The central mystery spans several planets, eventually leading to a mysterious idyllic world. St. Libra, a frontier planet controlled by the North family and home of the known worlds bio-oil production. Hamilton ties numerous characters through multiple complex plots all leading to a satisfying world changing conclusion.

After reading Hamilton’s Commonwealth Saga and being blown away by it’s scope; I was a bit afraid of being underwhelmed by this one. Fortunately Great North Road was fantastic. A 800 plus novel that I could not put down. A must read near future space opera for fans of large, complex, intelligent science fiction who enjoy an interesting mystery.